Norfolk Map Matrix

The matrices below shows mapped visualizations of predicted flooding from surge for observed climate conditions (1980-1999) and future scenarios in the periods 2020-2029, 2050-2059, and 2080-2099. For each of these time periods, probabilistic flooding is shown for the 1-year, 100-year, 500-year and 2500-year storm events. These storm events respectively correspond to a 100, 40, 10 and 2 percent probability of exceedance in a fifty-year time period. Surge risk analyses were statistically derived from synthetic storms by the SCR science and engineering team at Princeton University, led by Ning Lin. The flood levels shown include surge, tide, and sea level rise distributions, statistically combined.

The matrix below shows possible locations for the initiation of Fingers of High Ground (FHG) that will be selected by strategic opportunity, topography, and political process. The visualization is illustrative of the general change in orientation of settlement in relationship to the sea.

FHG are engineered landforms that meet the sea, river, or creek along their narrower dimension and extend inland between lower grounds. In the process they construct gradients along their length and width- gradients that are necessary to current ecologies and future settlement. Besides respecting the natural gradients between land and sea, FHG also pay close attention to rain. A resilient Norfolk must strategically hold rain while accommodating the sea, particularly in a storm event. The modelling shown here, however, does not capture the gradient nature of FHG nor their capacity to hold rain. It also does not show their individual incremental development. More information about FHG can be viewed here.

EXISTING CLIMATE
PROJECTED CLIMATE

1980 - 1999

2020 - 2029

2050 - 2059

2080 - 2099

Lambert’s Point Map Matrix

Lambert’s Point is a meeting of rail lines and shipping piers on the Elizabeth River. The project takes advantage of an existing ridge and transportation corridor to initiate a finger of high ground (FHG). The FHG begins in a ‘living pier’ in the Elizabeth River and continues inland along a rail corridor and warehouse district. This spine, upon which we propose a public walk, bike way, and emergency facilities in the short term, sets the higher elevations of the FHG at various places (ranging from 15’ to 26′ NAVD 88) while the lower elevations of associated low grounds and outlet channels for rain are set by a historic creek adjacent to the proposed FHG. More information about the proposal for Lambert’s Point can be found here.

EXISTING CLIMATE
PROJECTED CLIMATE

1980 - 1999

2020 - 2029

2050 - 2059

2080 - 2099

Willoughby Spit Map Matrix

Willoughby Spit is a former sand bar on the Chesapeake Bay adjacent to US Highway Route 64. It is occupied today primarily with beach houses and fishing facilities. The project takes advantage of the existing infrastructure of Route 64 and is organized along a raised spine that begins in a ‘living research pier’ in the Chesapeake Bay and continues inland as a road and bicycle path, servicing a beach and elementary school. Besides developing a series of FHG for short and long term uses, the resiliency strategy for Willoughby Spit also recovers low grounds and marsh lands adjacent to the FHG to hold and delay rain to reduce flooding during a storm event. The modeling, however, is unable to capture this latter aspect of the proposal. More information about the proposal for Willoughby Spit can be viewed here.

EXISTING CLIMATE
PROJECTED CLIMATE

1980 - 1999

2020 - 2029

2050 - 2059

2080 - 2099